Program and activities

Page Index

Autism-friendly family morning: National Science Week

Young Explorers August: Marvellous Mammals

Professor Flint's Shadows of the Prehistoric Past

Tree of Life: A night of science

The Kimberley Foundation Australia 20th anniversary lecture

Ivarityi Trail (ongoing activity created for NAIDOC week)

SALA Parlour at the Museum

 

Autism-friendly family morning: National Science Week

Autism morning

This event has now sold out.

Date: 18 August 2018
Time: 8am-10am
Location: South Australian Museum
Cost: Free, but bookings essential. Book here. 

During National Science Week, come along to the Museum before we open to the public. Children with autism and their families can enjoy a quieter, less crowded visit to the Museum, as well as participating in science and craft activities. This is a chance to see all of our permanent galleries, our Discovery Centre, and maybe discover something you've never noticed before!

 

Young Explorers August: Marvellous Mammals

Young Explorers mammals

Location: meet in the Main foyer.
Dates: 20 to 24 August
Times: 10:15am and 11:15am
Book here

Young Explorers, our program for 3-to-5-year-olds, is visiting all your furry favourites! Travel around the world in the Mammals Gallery.

Please note: This program has been specially designed for children aged 3 to 5 years – if you are bringing an accompanying sibling less than 3 years of age, please care for your younger child to allow the older sibling to fully enjoy the program.

You do not need to print your ticket. Our educators will check your name off at the beginning of the session.

Young Explorers is made for small family groups rather than childcare groups. If you are planning on coming to the Museum with a childcare group, please call 8207 7575 or email programs@samuseum.sa.gov.au to discuss your visit.

 

Professor Flint's Shadows of the Prehistoric Past

Prof. Flint

Location: The South Australian Museum, Pacific Cultures Gallery
Date and time:  Sunday 2 September, 11am and 12:15pm
Tickets: Bookings are recommeneded

Join singing palaeontologist Prof Flint on a delightful family friendly adventure to discover the critters that once walked and swam in the place where you now dwell.

Professor Flint’s In the Shadows of the Prehistoric Past is a location specific, interactive, musical, story-telling adventure across several key locations in regional and metro Australia, including the South Australian Museum. It is a storytelling experience that travels to the locations where the prehistoric stories have been revealed; to the communities where those stories are a part of who they are.

Tree of Life: a night of science

Tree of Life

Inspiring South Australia and the South Australian Museum present: Tree of life: a night of science

Location: The South Australian Museum
Date and time: 6pm, Wednesday 12 September 2018
Tickets: Museum Members $10 / General admission $12, including canapes. Drinks will be available for purchase. Book here.

To celebrate Spring and National Biodiversity Month, we bring you some extraordinary insights into evolution, extinction and the changing face of our Earth through the eyes of a handful of fabulous and fascinating South Australian scientists. The evening will include four short presentations followed by an interval for refreshments and networking, and a panel discussion with Q&A.

The evening will be emceed by Professor John Long from Flinders University. Presenters include:

  • Assoc. Prof. Diego Garcia-Bellido, SA Museum & University of Adelaide

  • Prof. Gavin Prideaux, Flinders University

  • Dr. Laura Weyrich, University of Adelaide

  • Dr. Zoe Doubleday, University of Adelaide

SALA Parlour at the Museum

SALA Parlour

When:  1 August - 31 August, Tues-Fri: 11am-5pm, Sat: 10am-4pm, Sun: 11am-4pm

The South Australian Living Artists Festival comes to the Museum. The state-wide festival celebrates the talented visual artists in South Australia. Drop in to the Parlour during the week or come along for special Sunday Session art workshops for 3-12 year olds and their families. 

The KFA 20th anniversary lecture

KFA

When: Thursday 20 September, 6 - 7pm (lecture will be followed by complimentary wine and nibbles in the Museum's main foyer)

Join us on the Kimberley Foundation Australia's 20th Anniversary, with a public lecture on how Kimberley rock art has become the focus of major research by Australia's leading archaeologists and scientists. Incorporated in the lecture will be the story of the foundation's history. Who were the people involved? How did the KFA create a model for funding research driven both by Aboriginal traditional custodians and the general public? 

Bookings are essential.

Ivarityi trail (ongoing activity created for NAIDOC week)

Cadets
Researchers Rebecca Richards (Adnyamathanha and Barngarla), Jacinta Koolmatrie (Adnyamathanha and Ngarrindjeri) and Jade Turner (Arrernte) have created the Ivarityi Trail, which highlights the connections between Aboriginal women and the objects on display in the Australian Aboriginal Cultures Gallery. These may be objects made by women, which tell stories of women or which are known to be used by women. Visitors are encouraged to pick up a map and take time to appreciate the stories and talents of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

 

Who was Ivarityi?
The trail has been named after Kaurna woman Ivarityi. You can find her along the trail as her knowledge of Kaurna culture was recorded by anthropologists which believed at the time that she was the last Kaurna woman with knowledge. Ivarityi was born in Yartapulti (Port Adelaide) during the 1840s, a time which marks the beginning of the invasion of Kaurna land. She also lived in Raukkan and Point Pearce. In all of the places she lived, she would have witnessed disease and the mistreatment of her people. To Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, she is a great example of the resilience of Aboriginal women. Because of her, we can!

 The Ivarityi trail has been developed by Rebecca Richards, Jacinta Koolmatrie and Jade Turner, whose participation in this program is made possible by a grant from Australian Executor Trustees to the South Australian Museum’s Pathways Program.